Leuchtturm 1917 Sketchbook Gestures

Gesture Drawings in Leuchtturm 1917 Sketchbook

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Figure Drawing Friday Already?

Welcome back to another Figure Drawing Friday. Time seems to fly as these come around. I’m always surprised that it’s time to post another one. I’m reaching back into the archives for this one.

Leuchtturm 1917 Sketchbook Gestures

This week I’m sharing some Leuchtturm 1917 Sketchbook gestures of a male model. I like the Leuchtturm Sketchbook a lot. It is slightly larger than a larger 8.25 x 11.75″ sized Moleskine at approximately 9×12″ (A4) and the pages are bright white instead of the Moleskine’s cream color. Of course, you lose the whiteness of the pages given the effect on the image file. I posted this on a blog (an old one) some time ago and played with it in an app that I don’t recall. It might have been Snapseed.

Cram Your Gestures On One Page!

This series of drawings came from a quick succession of two-minute poses. The model was standing on a platform raised slightly above the artists. At the time, our practice was to do 5 or 10 quick one-to-three minute gestures. I enjoy cramming all of my gestures onto one page. It prevents me from getting too picky about a drawing and lets me get a little more loose. After cramming ten loose gestures on the page, you have something that actually looks pretty good. I will post a full gesture page in the future.

This series of three drawings came out okay. I’m not super thrilled with each drawing individually, but I do like the arrangement of them combined on the page.

I drew this with a Col-erase blue pencil in the sketchbook version of a Leuchtturm 1917 notebook. Much like Moleskine Sketchbooks, the paper is much heavier than in the standard notebooks and takes ink well.

I Know I Said Don’t, but I Did.

I actually went to an open figure drawing studio again last week and drew some more Leuchtturm 1917 sketchbook gestures with a combination of Col-Erase red pencil and my Rotring 800 mechanical pencil. A couple of weeks ago, I posted that anything less than 18×24 feels cramped and that I wouldn’t advise anyone go figure drawing with mechanical pencil, but on that particular day I woke up late and was too lazy to drag my oak American Easel out, pack it into my truck, and take it to the drawing session. I will post drawings from that session soon.

That’s it for this week. Thanks for stopping by. Check out the rest of my Figure Drawing Friday posts.

Figure Drawing Friday – 22 March 19

Figure Drawing Friday 22 Mar 19

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Welcome back to Figure Drawing Friday

Welcome back to another Figure Drawing Friday. I’m still reaching into the archives this week and you’ve seen part of this image before in this previous post. Specifically, the butt of the figure on the left encroached on the previous crop of this week’s drawing and the seated figure is one you’ve seen before.

I didn’t draw these on the same day or on the same page. I combined the images digitally afterward. There was a time when I planned to combine a bunch of my figure drawings into a printed book, but I never got around to it. Perhaps I will resume the project in the future. I drew both illustrations with Col-Erase Carmine Red pencil in a Strathmore 11×14 hardcover sketchbook. At the time, I still drew smaller than I would today. For figure drawing any thing less than 18×24 feels cramped to me now.

The Seated Figure

As I said in the previous post that featured the seated figure, I’m really happy with that drawing. I should have drawn in the clavicles to further define the form in the front. I’m pretty sure at least some indication of the clavicles was present in the lighting at the time.

The Standing Figure

I drew the figure on the right in two or three minutes. It was a very short pose. Back then, I drew from life two or three times a week so I had a pretty good rhythm and my drawings came to me fairly quickly. It’s amazing what consistency can do for your work when you draw from life. Heck, consistency makes a big difference in all your drawings. I know it does for me and yet I still struggle with drawing often enough.

Back to the drawing… the standing figure came out pretty well. I like the realistic shape of the shoulder and the transition from the armpit to the breast and the foreshortening of the raised leg. I also feel like the tilt of the hip came out correctly.

If you enjoyed this installment of Figure Drawing Friday, check out my previous posts.

Figure Drawing Friday, March 8th 2019

Female Figure Drawings

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It’s Figure Drawing Friday again! And, again, I’m reaching into the archives. This weeks drawings are among my favorites. I composited the sketches in this weeks image in Photoshop–I didn’t draw them on the same page or at that relative size. No, each drawing is about 8 inches square. I drew these in a Strathmore 400 series 11 x 14 hardbound sketchbook (the old black cover design) with Col-Erase Carmine Red pencil.

The drawing on the left has proportion issues, but I like it anyway. The drawing in the center, of the model sitting and leaning forward, is high on my list of favorites. It was one of those days where everything just worked.

I like the foreshortening challenge of the pose and am pleased with the rendering of the shoulders, hips, and legs. The angles of the shoulders and neck are realistic. However, I should have have drawn the clavicles to make it stronger.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy the sketches.

Character Sketch. Playing with my Cintiq 16HD

dwarf concept sketch

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I’m a clumsy digital artist. I have a lot to learn, but I’m certainly enjoying the process. I doodled this character in pencil yesterday and snapped a photo of the sketch that I subsequently opened in Photoshop and colored using my Cintiq 16HD display tablet. There’s a lot I’d like to improve, but the process is fun.

Sketchbook Sketch.

Learning the shortcut keys in photoshop so you can manipulate your tools without taking your eyes and attention of your drawing is key. Without the shortcut keys you find yourself breaking your concentration and making entries to change tools constantly. My most used shortcuts are:

  • B for the brush tool
  • I for the eye dropper tool
  • R to rotate the canvas
  • Z to zoom in and out by dragging the pen left and right
  • L for the lasso tool
  • E for the eraser tool
  • the space bar for the move tool

Figure Drawing Friday, 22 Feb 19

Figure Drawing

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For this week’s figure Friday, I’m reaching way back into the archives. This drawing is about ten years old. It was one of those days where I surprised myself with this particular drawing. The likeness of the model is actually pretty good, although I made him look a bit younger than he actually was. I’m also pleased with the gesture of the pose and the weight of the models slight forward lean. This is a simple drawing done in a hardcover Strathmore sketchbook with pencil.

Figure Drawing Friday, February 1st, 2019

2 Minute Figure Drawing

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Sometimes you surprise yourself. This is a large gesture drawing, done in two minutes, on 18 x 24 newsprint with a charcoal pencil. This particular model had a wonderful shape and the pose accentuated the roundness of her form. The triangular overall shape is softened by the roundness of the shoulders and legs. There isn’t a single straight line in the whole drawing. The only thing close is maybe the eyebrow.