Figure Drawing Friday, January 25th 2019

Male Nude Figure Drawing From Life
Male Nude Figure Drawing From Life.

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This week’s figure drawing is another drawing I’m pseudo happy with. I actually really like the structure of the limbs and shoulders. The legs came out well even though they’re a little too stiff. The left leg should have a little more sag to show the compression in the chair, but I like the lighting on the lower legs. I’m not thrilled with the likeness, this didn’t really capture the model very well. However, I think the drawing works overall.

I’m not happy with the blocking in of the background. I’m not sure why I used those diagonal strokes to block in the area behind his left arm, but I think it would have worked better if the strokes were more horizontal. As it is, it just looks messy. I’ve also learned to be more deliberate in where I place those dark areas around a figure.

Generally, if you darken the area near a portion of the figure that is well lit, you create additional contrast and enhance that impression. If you leave the background near a darkened or shaded portion of the figure, the principle works the same way for the opposite effect.

This drawing was made on Strathmore Smooth Drawing Paper (18×24″) using General’s Charcoal 6B pencils.

Figure Drawing Friday, January 18th 2019

30 minute figure drawing

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Here’s another installment of Figure Drawing Friday. This week’s featured drawing isn’t what I consider to be one of my best, but I like it anyway. I would have liked to execute the subtleties in the shadows better. The mid-tones are not really well done. Overall, from a technical standpoint, this drawing needs a lot of work. However, I still like it.

Here’s why I like it. I like how dramatic the light is. I like the pose, and I am happy with the darkness on her face and the side of her face. Sometimes, it takes guts to go really dark in a drawing–at least for me. The contrast of the heavy blacks on her head is what saves this picture and makes it worth looking at. Your eye is drawn to that point of contrast and the image leaves its mark. It’s only after you’ve taken in this first bit that your eye wanders around the image and if you wander long enough you begin to find its faults.

So, the point is that even our images with poor execution sometimes have lessons in them and are still worth looking at.

This drawing was made on Strathmore Smooth Drawing Paper (18×24″) using General’s Charcoal 6B pencils.