Leuchtturm 1917 Sketchbook Gestures

Gesture Drawings in Leuchtturm 1917 Sketchbook

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Figure Drawing Friday Already?

Welcome back to another Figure Drawing Friday. Time seems to fly as these come around. I’m always surprised that it’s time to post another one. I’m reaching back into the archives for this one.

Leuchtturm 1917 Sketchbook Gestures

This week I’m sharing some Leuchtturm 1917 Sketchbook gestures of a male model. I like the Leuchtturm Sketchbook a lot. It is slightly larger than a larger 8.25 x 11.75″ sized Moleskine at approximately 9×12″ (A4) and the pages are bright white instead of the Moleskine’s cream color. Of course, you lose the whiteness of the pages given the effect on the image file. I posted this on a blog (an old one) some time ago and played with it in an app that I don’t recall. It might have been Snapseed.

Cram Your Gestures On One Page!

This series of drawings came from a quick succession of two-minute poses. The model was standing on a platform raised slightly above the artists. At the time, our practice was to do 5 or 10 quick one-to-three minute gestures. I enjoy cramming all of my gestures onto one page. It prevents me from getting too picky about a drawing and lets me get a little more loose. After cramming ten loose gestures on the page, you have something that actually looks pretty good. I will post a full gesture page in the future.

This series of three drawings came out okay. I’m not super thrilled with each drawing individually, but I do like the arrangement of them combined on the page.

I drew this with a Col-erase blue pencil in the sketchbook version of a Leuchtturm 1917 notebook. Much like Moleskine Sketchbooks, the paper is much heavier than in the standard notebooks and takes ink well.

I Know I Said Don’t, but I Did.

I actually went to an open figure drawing studio again last week and drew some more Leuchtturm 1917 sketchbook gestures with a combination of Col-Erase red pencil and my Rotring 800 mechanical pencil. A couple of weeks ago, I posted that anything less than 18×24 feels cramped and that I wouldn’t advise anyone go figure drawing with mechanical pencil, but on that particular day I woke up late and was too lazy to drag my oak American Easel out, pack it into my truck, and take it to the drawing session. I will post drawings from that session soon.

That’s it for this week. Thanks for stopping by. Check out the rest of my Figure Drawing Friday posts.

Figure Drawing Friday – 22 March 19

Figure Drawing Friday 22 Mar 19

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Welcome back to Figure Drawing Friday

Welcome back to another Figure Drawing Friday. I’m still reaching into the archives this week and you’ve seen part of this image before in this previous post. Specifically, the butt of the figure on the left encroached on the previous crop of this week’s drawing and the seated figure is one you’ve seen before.

I didn’t draw these on the same day or on the same page. I combined the images digitally afterward. There was a time when I planned to combine a bunch of my figure drawings into a printed book, but I never got around to it. Perhaps I will resume the project in the future. I drew both illustrations with Col-Erase Carmine Red pencil in a Strathmore 11×14 hardcover sketchbook. At the time, I still drew smaller than I would today. For figure drawing any thing less than 18×24 feels cramped to me now.

The Seated Figure

As I said in the previous post that featured the seated figure, I’m really happy with that drawing. I should have drawn in the clavicles to further define the form in the front. I’m pretty sure at least some indication of the clavicles was present in the lighting at the time.

The Standing Figure

I drew the figure on the right in two or three minutes. It was a very short pose. Back then, I drew from life two or three times a week so I had a pretty good rhythm and my drawings came to me fairly quickly. It’s amazing what consistency can do for your work when you draw from life. Heck, consistency makes a big difference in all your drawings. I know it does for me and yet I still struggle with drawing often enough.

Back to the drawing… the standing figure came out pretty well. I like the realistic shape of the shoulder and the transition from the armpit to the breast and the foreshortening of the raised leg. I also feel like the tilt of the hip came out correctly.

If you enjoyed this installment of Figure Drawing Friday, check out my previous posts.

Figure Drawing Friday, March 15, 2019

Figure Drawing Friday Title Image

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Red Gesture

Welcome back to another Figure Drawing Friday. This week, I’m once again reaching into the archives because I haven’t drawn from life in a few months. I drew these images independently in my sketchbooks and composited them digitally. The red female figure is a quick gesture drawing that I did during a two-minute pose. I’m very pleased with this drawing. I drew it in red pen (Pilot Precise V5 Extra Fine), so what you see is the first attempt with no wasted marks. I rarely get so lucky to get proportion and structure right so quickly and the first time I put a mark down.

Elderly Couple at Buffet

The elderly couple in the image came from a quick drawing session at a hotel in Washington D.C. a few years ago. I drew these people as they browsed the breakfast buffet. This is another ink drawing…if I recall I used a Copic F02 Drawing Pen, its razor point is great for fine lines, but terrible on paper with any kind of tooth because it scratches it.

Fifteen Minute Poses

The nude female in the remaining two drawings is a model I’ve drawn frequently. These poses we’re both approximately 15 minutes long. If you look at the drawings carefully, you’ll notice I completely blew it on the model’s likeness. If I didn’t point out that the drawings were of the same person, most viewers would not expect that they were the same person. Likeness is so critical to get right and so easy to get wrong. I drew these two illustrations with a mechanical pencil, probably an Alvin Draft-Matic .5mm. That was my go-to mechanical pencil before I got my Rotring 800.

In those days, I often drew from life with a mechanical pencil, but I would not recommend that to anyone today. With a mechanical pencil, you lose the ability to create line variation with a change of your wrist’s angle. Instead, I recommend you either use a traditional pencil or Col-Erase pencil with a long sharpened point, or better yet, a color pencil like a Prismacolor Black or blue, a china marker, or charcoal pencil. Sharpening a long point will give you more surface area for line variation and if you use a soft enough tool — I recommend 6B — you can get good variation in the darkness of your marks.

Thanks for checking out another Figure Drawing Friday. If you like this post, check out the others.

Figure Drawing Friday, March 8th 2019

Female Figure Drawings

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It’s Figure Drawing Friday again! And, again, I’m reaching into the archives. This weeks drawings are among my favorites. I composited the sketches in this weeks image in Photoshop–I didn’t draw them on the same page or at that relative size. No, each drawing is about 8 inches square. I drew these in a Strathmore 400 series 11 x 14 hardbound sketchbook (the old black cover design) with Col-Erase Carmine Red pencil.

The drawing on the left has proportion issues, but I like it anyway. The drawing in the center, of the model sitting and leaning forward, is high on my list of favorites. It was one of those days where everything just worked.

I like the foreshortening challenge of the pose and am pleased with the rendering of the shoulders, hips, and legs. The angles of the shoulders and neck are realistic. However, I should have have drawn the clavicles to make it stronger.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy the sketches.

Figure Drawing Friday, March 1, 2019

Figure drawings

Time flies when you’re having fun. It’s already Figure Drawing Friday again. The drawings featured this week are from a few years ago. This was when I had a drawing venue that allowed opportunities for figure drawing from a model several times a week. The frequency with which you draw from life dramatically impacts your ability to do it well.

When I did these drawings, I was mostly drawing line art without a ton of value. My style and approach has changed a lot since then. However, I was able to drop lines and proportions and shapes onto the paper with good accuracy very quickly at the time.

I should also mention that these drawings aren’t very large. I drew them in an 11×14 hardcover sketchbook and used col-erase blue pencils. All four of the drawings are of the same model. You can see some variation in the likeness of her face. Likeness is always hard to capture consistently. Her figure, however, is fairly consistent in all the poses. You can see some of my construction lines in the drawings. At the time, I usually began a drawing with the rib cage (as a simple oval) and the hips (another oval) connected with a simple gesture line to approximate the spine and general energy of the pose. The poses for these drawings varied between 3 and 20 minutes.