New Toy: Sprung for a Wacom Cintiq 16HD

Wacom Cintiq 16

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Some years ago, I owned a Wacom Cintiq 13HD. I liked having a pen display quite a bit. Not having the hand-eye coordination issues of drawing on a tablet like my Wacom Intuos Pro and having to look at a separate screen was great. However, I didn’t feel like I had enough room on the 13″ display.

A few weeks ago, I visited the Wacom Discovery Center in Portland and got to play around with all of Wacom’s current products. I really liked the massive Wacom Cintiq Pro 32″ and 24″ but they’re a little overkill for me right now. So, instead, I bought the 16″ Cintiq that Wacom released recently. It lacks touch controls and doesn’t come with the Express Key Remote (although they are compatible), but it’s entry level price is pretty great by comparison to the larger tablets. Wacom’s new Pro Pen 2 with over 8000 pressure levels is included, however. The display connects with a 3-in-1 cable, so you need an HDMI port and a USB port to connect it to your computer. I use a late 2013 MacBook Pro, so I have these conveniently located on the right side.

Barbarian Character for an old D&D Game. Affectionately named Groo after Sergio Aragone’s Comic Series.

I’ll post a more comprehensive review in the near future. For now, enjoy this little clumsy doodle that I drew on my old 13″ Cintiq.

Figure Drawing Friday, January 11th 2019

figure drawing illustrations. Short poses.
5-10 Minute Pose Drawings.

Welcome back to Figure Drawing Friday. For this week’s post, I chose a page of illustrations drawn from short poses. These drawings are charcoal work on smooth newsprint. I prefer General’s 6B Charcoal Pencils.

During short poses, sometimes called gestures, it’s often taught to capture the motion or the essence of a figure. However, when I took the Henry Yan workshop I mentioned in the previous post, he instructed us to just focus on a part of the figure we found challenging. The rib cage illustrations you see pictured here are both five minute poses. The hands are between seven and ten minute drawings.

I found it very beneficial to just focus on an area of the figure or pose that challenged me. I still do this exercises when I have the opportunity to draw short poses. When I say short poses, I’m generally referring to poses between five and fifteen minutes in length.

When I refer to a gesture pose, it’s typically a one minute pose, and occasionally a two-minute pose.

In a future Figure Drawing Friday, I’ll post a page of one minute gestures.

Figure Drawing Friday, January 4th 2019

5 minute sketch, from life, on 18×24 newsprint

Welcome back for another Figure Drawing Friday. This time, I actually got the post out on Friday. How about that? The drawing featured this week is a 5 minute sketch done in graphite on 18×24 smooth newsprint. I prefer smooth newsprint over the rough stuff because the way both charcoal pencils and graphite adhere to the page.

I like short poses!

For a five-minute drawing I rarely get this much of the figure down. Instead, I’ll focus on some area that I find challenging and then try to capture that part of the figure or at least the essence of it. It’s an expansion of the approach I use for one-minute gesture drawings.

This particular drawing came quickly. I liked the pose and if you really look at it, captured it with very few lines. Her spine is indicated by one line in the lower back and a small mark between the shoulder blades. The shape on her neck is the basic shaper here clasped hands made. I didn’t even try to capture the fingers in such a short time. I’m particularly pleased with the weight and balance of the pose. It looks believable and the angle of the model’s hips is also authentic. I didn’t get to the feet either.

I don’t like to draw feet, because I’m not great at it

I would probably had drawn in the feet if I’d had another ten minutes or so to refine the drawing, but to be honest, I’ve ruined more than one drawing through feet. The angles of the feet are complex. Some artists can capture the essence of a foot’s shape and make it look credible with just a few strokes. I am not one of those artists. If I don’t take my time on feet, I wind up rendering club-footed figures…thus ruining an otherwise decent effort. Therefore, I force myself just to study feet (and hands) sometimes. Capturing hands well is just about as important as capturing faces when communicating in a drawing and you don’t want to wreck it by drawing shitty feet.

Anatomy study is critical. One of my favorite anatomy books is Figure Drawing: Design and Invention by Michael Hampton. I’ll do a review of this book in the future. I have two editions of this book. Both are fantastic! Check out Michael Hampton’s Blog here.